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Lochinver Scotland

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Information on the village of Lochinver in Scotland.

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The War Memorial The War Memorial & Cairn at Inchnadamph, Scotland
The War Memorial

The War Memorial & Cairn at Inchnadamph

The War Memorial & Cairn at Inchnadamph

The War Memorial
In early April 1941, an Anson bomber crashed 2300 feet (700 metres) above sea level on Ben More Assynt, near Inchnadamph. Despite an extensive search it was six weeks before the snow line melted back and a shepherd found the wrecked plane and the remains of its six man crew.
The passage of time and the remoteness of the site meant that the airmen were buried at the scene, the only site in Scotland where this happened. A cairn was erected over their grave, but a more accessible memorial was erected at the churchyard gate, the trough below it containing soil from the burial site.
In the graveyard, just behind the memorial, is a marker for the burial of the remains of a brother of HA Tompsett, one of the airmen.
They are together again, in death.

The Cairn
Above Inchnadamph, on the top of the mound, there is a cairn which was erected in 1930 to two geologists, Ben Peach and John Horne, whose work in the area, during the last quarter of the nineteenth century, played in a major part in resolving the complexities of the geological history of the area.
As a result of their work Inchnadamph, and the Hotel, in particular, became a magnet for geologists worldwide.
Today the area is part of the first European Geopark in Scotland.
For further information about the Geopark:
Northwest Highlands Geopark

The Names of the Airmen The War Memorial & Cairn at Inchnadamph, Scotland
The Names of the Airmen
The Peach and Horne Cairn The War Memorial & Cairn at Inchnadamph, Scotland
The Peach and Horne Cairn

The War Memorial & Cairn at Inchnadamph, Scotland